I Think I'll Go to Boston

I Think I'll Go to Boston

"Why are you going to Boston?” asked the middle-aged couple sitting on the plane next to me, their Massachusetts accents heavy and bright smiles welcoming.

“Oh, no reason, really!” I answered.

One Direction. I had bought a $300 plane ticket to Boston to see One Direction.

Spending hundreds of dollars to see four British boys/angels may not have been the most financially-conscious decision, but these periodic weekend runaways are my attempts to put distance between myself and the maddening life questions that come along with young adulthood. Because as I wrote in a previous post, I’ve been having a bit of a tiff with my current life’s circumstances. I’ve been bitter against Nashville for reasons unfair to lay against such a fair and lovely city as this one. So I keep running away.

But I come back. I have no choice but to come back. I have responsibilities in Nashville, obligations that keep me tethered to her Tennessee moors. The anchor is heavy and it’s sunk deep in these city limits. For now, I must stay.

In the meantime, though, I buy plane tickets - so many plane tickets - and I run away as a means of escaping my discomfort, this time to Boston and a One Direction concert.

After an opening set from Augustana (high school me had a spiritual moment when hearing “Boston” actually IN Boston) and Icona Pop, One Direction took the stage, and the concert was exactly as you might expect - lots of high-pitched squeals and mass hysteria and Harry Styles being an absolute BABE (I mean, c’mon he used the word “decorum” in a sentence and SWOON AM I RIGHT). It. Was. Perfect.

But now I am back in Nashville and I am once again facing my existential crisis and once again feeling so many feelings, all of which I wish I could make disappear by making a sarcastic parenthetical comment and calling it a day. Jetting off to a beautiful city hundreds of miles away to scream and swoon alongside preteen girls at a boyband concert didn’t cure me of my ever-nagging life questions, didn’t solve my problems, didn’t provide me with some massive life revelation and didn’t make it easier to be content with my newly-settled routine.

However, my little runaway weekend to Boston did allow me a break from Nashville and seeing One Direction allowed me a break from adulthood, and in that brief span of 36 hours, I wasn’t thinking about all the frustrating things I’m usually thinking about. I wasn’t constantly pressuring myself to figure out my future; I wasn’t berating myself for the poor decisions of my past that have left me feeling like a fool. I was simply and fully there, simply and fully living.

So no, running away hasn’t solved my problems or provided answers to the questions I keep asking myself. Running away never will make our lives easier and I know that and we all know that. But running away reminded me that life can be whimsical, can be lighthearted, can be fun - all things I’ve forgotten over this past summer. So I think I'll go to Boston, and Austin, and New Zealand, and Tuscon and wherever else my wandering heart (and entry-level wages) will take me. Who knows, maybe one day coming back to Nashville will feel like it used to feel: like coming home.


Life After the Move

Life After the Move

What to Do When You Just Really, Really, Really Want to Give Up

What to Do When You Just Really, Really, Really Want to Give Up